This past weekend, two of our founders, Alex & Komal, had the fortune to attend the Social Good Summit co-hosted in NYC, Beijing, Nairobi and Somalia. The agenda was crafted to create ongoing commentaries on how technology has developed new methods of doing good and changing the world.

Claire, the Social Innovation Lead at Twitter, spoke about how the statement: “Advocacy starts at home,” has changed. It’s not longer about only being an advocate of your own geographical community – your neighborhood, school, local church – it’s about recognizing that you’re part of a global community now.

And that means being an advocate by sitting at home and utilizing the tools in front of you to make change for the betterment of others or their situations.

The CEO of Meetup, Scott Heiferman, said that: “The point of having phones in our pockets is to find the others. To connect, collaborate, and do good.”

And that’s the point. Social media and technology aren’t agents of change. WE ARE.

We, at MedStartr, believe our platform is one of those tools for changing the world – our world is our healthcare system. And not just domestically, internationally as well. Our projects such as Saving Mothers lends itself to the topic of how technology has changed philanthropy.

Like Facebook or Twitter, MedStartr is a tool for social revolution.  It is putting information out there, generating impressions and bringing the public into the folds of change and empowering people with the opportunity to vote with their wallets and directly influence the flow of change.

Crowdfunding has allowed every person, every patient, everyone with access to the internet, to become an advocate. Either for themselves or others. It has allowed everyone to become a philanthropist.

Our platform and projects have allowed communities of people with the same needs to be formed and it has allowed communities of donors to be formed, helping to extend solutions to people in need.

How? By helping projects and startups reach the marketplace. Viewed this way, isn’t crowdfunding a philanthropy of the masses? Doesn’t it unify individuals into one actor that uses its money for the betterment of others?

Be on the lookout for more posts in the coming week related to the Social Good Summit (#SGSGlobal). We’ll be covering more points from various speakers on the panels.